Reflections from the African Studies Association (ASA) 2017

I was very excited to attend the African Studies Association (ASA) in Chicago from Nov. 16 – 18 in part because I recently attended the African Studies Association in Africa (ASAA) in Accra in October 2017. I was keen to observe the differences and possible similarities. Right off the bat, the first thing I noticed… Continue reading Reflections from the African Studies Association (ASA) 2017

Shifting Norms of Professionalization in a Nairobi Technology Start-Up Community

I've been a bit behind in updating the blog with some observations from the African Studies Association (ASA) conference that I just attended earlier this month (Nov. 16 - 18). I'm working on a separate post on the conference and will upload shortly... But in the time being, I'd like to share the paper that… Continue reading Shifting Norms of Professionalization in a Nairobi Technology Start-Up Community

Revised HIST290 Reading [more focused!]

While I have been reading quite broadly (as is quite common I think for the orals literatures development process) and generally following this list (though definitely not as closely as I had hoped!), for purposes of completing this quarter with a tangible output, I've decided to narrow in on a particular topic that will enable… Continue reading Revised HIST290 Reading [more focused!]

Refusing to Research: An Alternative Lens on Ethics

Willoughby-Herard (2015) writes about why she decided not to write about and research black South African women (despite attempts by South African archivists to redirect her to write about them). She states: “We do not get to claim space in each other’s histories simply because we want to or because we have been in political… Continue reading Refusing to Research: An Alternative Lens on Ethics

Genre: Grant writing

I've been deep in grant writing for the past two weeks (a big anthropological fieldwork grant from the Wenner-Gren Foundation was due today) so while I have been furiously reading, it's of a different sort of reading than it would/will be for development of my orals documents. Nonetheless, while part of me detests the genre of… Continue reading Genre: Grant writing

Fanon and Du Bois on the “color line”

We ended last week’s joint class with Professor Chandler musing about whether as scholars we should be attempting to move beyond using race as a core categorical/analytical concept, or if we continue to use it while recognizing the potential danger of (further) reifying it as a useful category of significant human (socio/cultural/biological) difference. I’ve got… Continue reading Fanon and Du Bois on the “color line”

The Nation-State, Pan-Africanism and Biosocial Claims to Knowledge

This past week, I participated in the second biennial conference of the African Studies Association of Africa (ASAA) on “African Studies and Global Politics.” The ASAA seeks to promote the study of Africa from an Africanist perspective, and as such, much of the discourse at the conference was related to pan-Africanism, decolonizing the mind/knowledge, and… Continue reading The Nation-State, Pan-Africanism and Biosocial Claims to Knowledge